Share

CLIMATE ACTION PROGRAMME


CLIMATE LEADER PAPERS

  1. Dr. Andrew Steer
    Sustainable cities: vision to reality 20 January 2014

    Andrew Steer, President, World Resources Institute (WRI)

    Asia,North America,South America,Smart Cities

With strong vision and commitment, it is possible to transform a city. Embracing sustainability can bring both economic expansion and political rewards. The stories of New York, Qingdao, Curitiba and Bangalore (pictured below) carry important lessons for urban leaders looking to create jobs while improving conditions for people and the environment.

In the late 20th century, Times Square in the heart of New York City was best known for its neon lights, traffic jams and seedy bars. Today, it has been transformed into one of the most innovative and people-friendly areas of any urban landscape.

In fact, over the past decade, New York City itself has become not only a centre for business and entertainment, but an iconic symbol of sustainable urban planning. In 2007, Mayor Michael Bloomberg, backed by a world-class team, launched PlaNYC to shift the model for the city’s growth. They sought to increase revenues while cutting pollution and increasing resilience to climate change.

The results have been impressive: New York has cut its carbon emissions by 16 per cent below 2005 levels, halfway to its 2030 target. They have increased the use of sustainable transport, including installing more than 300 miles of bicycle lanes and launching the largest cycle-share programme in the United States. Meanwhile, the city has lowered its air pollution and reduced traffic injuries and deaths. Life expectancy for New Yorkers has reached a record high.

The message from New York’s success is clear. With a strong vision and commitment to sustainability, it is possible to transform a city. Embracing sustainability can bring both economic expansion and political rewards. Further, these rewards can be achieved within a mayor’s political lifetime.

 

Solutions, not more problems

Already, half the world’s population lives in cities. An additional 75 million people will be added to urban areas each year. The bulk of this growth will be witnessed across Asia, Africa, and Latin America, which are home to many of the most rapidly emerging economies. The direction that cities take today will be a determining factor for sustainability for decades to come.

At their worst, cities can be a major drain on resources. Urban areas with large populations and voracious consumption patterns consume energy and water, and create waste. Cities produce nearly 70 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions. In developing countries, cities bear up to 80 per cent of the costs associated with climate change. But, if they are designed right, a far different outcome emerges.

Many of today’s most liveable cities – like Singapore, Vancouver, or San Francisco (pictured left) – bring together compact design, low emissions, and green space to create healthy environments for both people and planet. Well-designed and connected cities are more efficient and liveable. Tackling problems such as congestion, bad air quality, lack of physical activity, and waste management can help reduce health costs, lower carbon emissions, and capture methane. These, in turn, offer a critical co-benefit – climate change mitigation.

The evidence is overwhelming that this is possible. For more than a decade, the World Resources Institute (WRI) has been working on urban issues, especially around transport, to address the needs of the world’s urban populations. Through its EMBARQ programme – which has seven centres around the world – it has helped improve urban design, cut carbon pollution, decrease road fatalities, and save commuters time and money. WRI is also working to develop low-carbon economic growth models for cities. It is currently road testing a Greenhouse Gas Protocol to help urban communities measure and manage their emissions, and already more than 60 cities are already using it. Other projects include identifying and mapping water risks to ensure that people have access to clean, reliable water supplies.

The following sections describe some examples that offer clear, practical urban solutions drawn from WRI’s on-the-ground projects, and highlight key lessons in sustainable mobility.

 

Qingdao, China

Leadership is essential to create a common vision and enhance coordination. Nowhere is the urban transition more high-profile than in China. By 2030, 221 Chinese cities will have at least one million residents. Meanwhile, the country’s 12th Five Year Plan emphasises sustainable urban development. The country’s urban centres are looking to reconcile their rapid growth with national sustainability priorities.

To that end, WRI has been working with several cities in China to develop ‘sustainability blueprints’ – plans to create environmentally sustainable and liveable cities. This project, which was catalysed with support of the Caterpillar Foundation, aims to test approaches in several key pilot cities and scale them up to national and international levels.

The coastal city of Qingdao (pictured right), in eastern Shandong province, is one such city. WRI has helped to map a sustainability blueprint for the city of about 8.5 million people. The three-phase approach aims to: first, diagnose problem areas in land use and transport planning; second, develop feasibility studies and solutions that can be incorporated into the city’s transport policy agenda; and third, disseminate these lessons to other growing cities in China.

Although the national government highlights the importance of addressing both economic development and environment, few cities have concrete strategies and a truly coordinated approach to achieve this goal. WRI is working with Qingdaoto develop thefirst-ever strategic study for a comprehensive, integrated land use–transport plan. The recommendations of the study focus onretoolingexisting urban planning practicesandincorporatingthe broader land use system where transport activities are embedded.The study underscores the benefits of transit-oriented developmentat different geographical scales

Through our experience in Qingdao, it has become clear that coordinating between multiple agencies can be a challenge. Getting buy-in from local leadership is essential. One helpful approach has been to seek greater intervention from the city mayor who is, more often than not, best positioned to coordinate the various synergies for a project’s overall success. The mayor, for example, has been able to initiate a top-down planning mechanism to break down the silos among different government departments.

 

Curitiba, Brazil

Create success and others will follow. Curitiba, in the south of Brazil,is often cited as one of Latin America’s most liveable cities. Jaime Lerner, the former mayor of Curitiba and a WRI Board member, has argued that with the right leadership, vision, and communication with constituents, a city official can radically shift a city’s trajectory. He achieved such success in Curitiba.

Mayor Lerner (pictured left) set a truly innovative vision for a green city. In the early 1970s, the city embraced a Master Plan that presented a strong vision and approach that would focus on people. The plan looked beyond transport, incorporating urban design, waste management, and other quality-of-life issues. The city has become well known for its integrated transport and land use development. For example, Curitiba implemented a low-cost, sophisticated system where buses travel on their own lanes, now known all round the world as bus rapid transit (BRT). Roughly 70 per cent of the city’s commuters now use the BRT to get to work.

The city’s success has encouraged a more positive approach to sustainable urban planning throughout Latin America. The BRT model initially implemented in Curitiba is now being used in 56 cities in Latin America –a third of the cities in the world with bus corridors.

Other cities have built on Curitiba’s success with advanced traffic management and the use of new information systems. New technologies are also improving the operational and environmental performance of bus systems.

The development of BRT has also helped attract additional investments in sustainable transport systems throughout Latin America. Countries such as Brazil, Mexico and Colombia have implemented national programmes to provide needed finance and technical capacity for transport. The EMBARQ centre in Mexico has been instrumental in the implementation of PROTRAM, a funding programme for mass transit, which is supporting 34 Mexican cities.

 

Bangalore, India

Collaboration at multiple levels leads to consensus. Bangalore is the third-largest city in India, home to about 8.75 million people. While often cited as a positive example of modern development, the city has been struggling recently under the weight of its growth. Rapid motorisation has created increased congestion, longer commute times, and poor air quality in Bangalore and many other Indian cities.

WRI’s experts have been working closely with officials at the Bangalore Metropolitan Transport Corporation (BMTC) – the city’s sole provider of bus-based transport services – to improve transport systems and urban design. As one of the largest public transport operators in India, BMTC’s fleet of 6,500 buses carries around 5 million passenger trips daily, accounting for 42 per cent of all motorised trips in the city.

Our team in India has been helping develop a city-wide, high-frequency connective grid of bus services

Our team in India has been helping develop a city-wide, high-frequency connective grid of bus services – the Bangalore Intra-City Grid (BIG) Bus Network – providing research and technical support throughout the process. The BIG Bus Network is expected to improve the quality of city bus services in Bangalore, and will be supplemented by additional infrastructure upgrades, including new transfer facilities, integrated fares, simplified route numbers, better passenger information systems and unified branding.

Challenges emerged, however, largely because the BMTC senior management has experienced frequent changes within its ranks. Several previous initiatives to improve city bus services had fallen into disarray, partly due to this inconsistent leadership. For our recommendations to take hold, the vision has to be supported and executed – regardless of changes at the top.

In response, EMBARQ India’s experts started working with BMTC staff at all levels. Our team conducted multiple workshops with BMTC staff, practiced collaborative data collection and planning exercises, and established mechanisms for continuous feedback across the organisation. EMBARQ experts helped train BMTC staff in data collection and performance monitoring, oversaw travel demand assessments and surveys, provided technical support for route and service planning, and collaborated on communications strategies.

On 16 September 2013, BMTC launched the BIG Bus Network with an initial 62 buses on Hosur road. Thepilot corridorhas already improved transport services for its 53,000 daily passengers, shaving commuters’ average wait times by 56 per cent.

A second major reform will be the creation of suburban ‘feeder’ routes, connecting peripheral destinations to the BIG Bus Network. When fully rolled out across the city, the BIG Bus Network will positively impact an estimated 2.5 million passengers by 2016. The network’s early success is already making an impact on other cities, with Ahmedabad, Chennai and Mumbai planning to follow Bangalore’s example.

 

Bringing sustainable cities to life

Cities are living organisms, as Professor Geoffrey West has said. Leaders must respond accordingly. If done right, the rewards – for leaders and their constituents – are great. Looking beyond the big picture, implementing the nuts and bolts is critical for success.

Going back to New York, strong leadership and a clear vision are absolutely critical. From Qingdao, we find that consolidation among agencies is essential. From Curitiba, we learn how a powerful model can scale up sustainable strategies elsewhere. And from Bangalore, we find that collaboration at various levels can bring consensus for reform. Across all of these examples, it is clear that sustainability cannot be merely a short-term idea. It takes time and commitment to see real change.

At a time when progress at the international level is moving too slowly, there is considerable hope in cities. Strong and determined city leaders can respond to constituent needs quickly and take meaningful actions. Their success can help improve the lives of millions of people – and create momentum for sustainable growth around the world.

 

Author

  1. Dr. Andrew Steer
    Dr. Andrew Steer

    World Resources Institute

     

Dr. Andrew Steer

Dr. Andrew Steer is the President and CEO of the World Resources Institute. Dr. Steer joined WRI from the World Bank, where he served as Special Envoy for Climate Change since 2010. He guided Bank Group efforts on climate change in more than 130 countries, oversaw the $7 billion Climate investment Funds, and led the World Bank's engagement on international climate negotiations. He was a member of UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's High Level Panel on Sustainable Energy for All and on the B20 Board on Green Growth.

World Resources Institute

The World Resources Institute is a global research organisation that spans more than 50 countries, with offices in the United States, China, India, Brazil, and more. More than 300 experts and staff work closely with leaders to turn big ideas into action to sustain our natural resources.

Related Articles

blog comments powered by Disqus

NEWSLETTER

PUBLICATION

Climate Action features expert analysis and opinion and is an essential guide for businesses looking to reduce their carbon footprint

Download Here Find Out More

TWITTER

CLIMATE NEWS
  • Vanuatu Law Reforms Culminate in Launch of Online Business Registry

    The benefits of a series of legal reforms are set to be realized in Vanuatu, with the opening of an online service that will dramatically simplify the way business is done in the country.

    ADB President Pledges Expanded Support For Fiji and Pacific Islands

    ADB President Takehiko Nakao today met with Fiji Prime Minister Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama.

    ADB Extends $20 Million to Protect Vulnerable Batumi Coastline

    ADB has approved a $20 million loan to stem coastal erosion around the popular Black Sea tourist destination of Batumi.

    ADB dan PT SMI Bekerjasama untuk Dorong Proyek Pemerintah-Swasta di Indonesia

    Asian Development Bank dan PT Sarana Multi Infrastruktur Indonesia hari ini menandatangani nota kesepahaman (Memorandum of Understanding, MOU) untuk memberi konsultasi bersama dalam kerjasama pemerintah-swasta.

    SMI, ADB Partner to Accelerate PPP Projects in Indonesia

    ADB and Indonesia’s PT Sarana Multi Infrastruktur signed a memorandum of understanding today to co-advise on public-private partnerships.

  • Dynamic discussions at WFC 2015 in Durban? Think CIFOR

    We’re looking forward to some great knowledge exchange with our colleagues from around the world, at the World Forestry Congress...

    A panel of experts discuss landscapes at World Water Week

    [No supplied article summary]

    52nd Annual Meeting of The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation

    [No supplied article summary]

    Who Pays and Who Benefits? – Side event at SBSTA-42

    [No supplied article summary]

    A Science–Policy Interaction Platform on Forests – Side event at UNFF-11

    [No supplied article summary]

  • EU Bank intensifies activity in Western Balkan countries

    Werner Hoyer, President of the EIB, announced at the Western Balkans Summit in Vienna a number of projects which the EU Bank is ready to finance in the near future, including the “Rail Route 10” within Kosovo * . Further operations envisaged by the EU Bank include the Trans-Adriatic Pipeline (TAP-project), where EIB launched the initial appraisal. The TAP-project will help diversify gas supply to the European Union and provide an opportunity to develop the use of gas as source of energy in th...

    EIB adds third benchmark to its EUR Green Bond curve

    CAB 2023 complements CAB 2019 and CAB 2026 EUR 10bn CAB issuance testament to EIB’s strategic commitment Highest Sustainability Bond Rating yet assigned by oekom On 20 August 2015, the European Investment Bank (EIB), the EU Bank owned by the EU Member States, rated Aaa/AAA/AAA (Moody’s / Standard and Poor’s / Fitch), issued a new EUR 600m Climate Awareness Bond (CAB). The issue carries an annual coupon of 0.5%, has a final maturity date of 15 November 2023 and has been priced in line with ...

    EIB and Šiaulių agree funding for refurbishing Lithuanian homes

    Continuing a longstanding cooperation, AB Šiaulių bankas and the European Investment Bank (EIB) have signed a EUR 68 million operational agreement under the Jessica II fund which will support the refurbishment and modernisation of around 350 multi-apartment buildings in Lithuania. In addition, Šiaulių bankas agreed to provide EUR 30 million of own funds for the refurbishment of a further 125 multi-apartment buildings. In May this year the EIB was appointed manager of the EUR 150 million “Jess...

    Bank deleveraging slowed down in Eastern Europe while capital outflows moderated

    Banks in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe (CESEE) reduced the pace of deleveraging in the first quarter of 2015 compared with the previous quarter, and the related capital outflows moderated. Credit growth continued to diverge across the CESEE region, according to the latest report from the Vienna Initiative Steering Committee . Banks reporting to the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) reduced their exposure to the region by 0.3 percent of GDP in the first quarter of 2015, follo...

    MEF-EIB agreement: EUR 133 million to Anas for road and tunnel safety

    An agreement for financing Anas's three-year plan to upgrade the Italian road network was signed today between the European Investment Bank (EIB) and the Economics and Finance Ministry (MEF) at the Ministry's offices. The agreement was signed by the Director General of the Italian Treasury Vincenzo La Via and EIB Vice-President Dario Scannapieco in the presence of Anas CEO Gianni Armani. The loan amounts to EUR 133 million, the first tranche of total financing of EUR 300 million. Specifically...

  • Cities and Local Governments Day

    Paris, France

    People´s Climate March

    Paris, France

    City Climate Leadership Award Ceremony

    Paris, France

    UCLG World Council (exact dates tbd)

    Paris, France

    CEMR Annual Meeting (exact date tbd)

    Paris, France

  • IDB selects 15 startups to participate in Demand Solutions program

    IDB chooses 15 startups from Latin America and the Caribbean to take part in Demand Solutions on September 29 in Washington.

    Jamaica will promote economic growth with IDB support

    Jamaica will strengthen its structural program for economic growth with a $130 million loan from the IDB.

    Jamaica launches new electronic procurement system

    The government of Jamaica announced today the launch of the countrys first electronic procurement platform: eTendering System.

    IDB supports energy efficiency and renewable energy schemes in low-cost housing project

    IDB approved a non-refundable financing that will support efficiency and renewable energy schemes in low-cost housing project in Argentina.

    Inter-American Development Bank report highlights business opportunities at the base of the pyramid in Latin America and the Caribbean

    IDB releases report on market at the base of the pyramid in Latin America and the Caribbean, with significant potential for private sector.

  • IISD Refreshes Its Visual Identity

    In the 25 years since IISD was established our mission to promote human development and environmental sustainability has become more urgent. History-making strides have been made to lift billions out of poverty, yet the burden that we place on our natural environment is less sustainable than ever.

    It was with that broad canvas as a back-drop that IISD renewed its strategic plan last year. The result places a tighter focus on six core priorities that meet the critical need for applied sustainability solutions.  



    Underpinning our strategy is a belief that communicating both the vital importance of developing sustainably, as well as the work that IISD is doing in support of that objective, is essential to its success. IISD was a global leader in the use of innovative communication when it was founded, including as an early adopter of Web-based communications. But the communication landscape is moving at speed. So must we.

    A new IISD visual identity, released over the...

    Migration and Conservation in the Lake Albert Ecosystem

    Migration is playing a significant role in the deterioration of the Lake Albert ecosystem in Buliisa District. Migrants, mainly coming from neighbouring provinces in the Democratic Republic of Congo, are pulled to the region by the economic opportunities presented by the fishery, and are willing to work for wages lower than those demanded by the local population. Expanding access to new markets, made possible by infrastructure investments linked to oil and gas exploration, have similarly increased demand for fish from buyers as far away as Kampala. These two forces—increasing demand for fish and increasing supply of labour—have resulted in a fishery dangerously close to collapse: larger species of fish are increasingly rare, while the fish caught are of increasingly smaller size across species. While the implications of this for local livelihoods are significant, current political incentives are aligned with maintaining the status quo. The fishery will continue to...

    Migration and Conservation in the Lake Albert Ecosystem (Policy Brief)

    Migration is playing a significant role in the deterioration of the Lake Albert ecosystem in Buliisa District. Migrants, mainly coming from neighbouring provinces in the Democratic Republic of Congo, are pulled to the region by the economic opportunities presented by the fishery, and are willing to work for wages lower than those demanded by the local population. Expanding access to new markets, made possible by infrastructure investments linked to oil and gas exploration, have similarly increased demand for fish from buyers as far away as Kampala. These two forces—increasing demand for fish and increasing supply of labour—have resulted in a fishery dangerously close to collapse: larger species of fish are increasingly rare, while the fish caught are of increasingly smaller size across species. While the implications of this for local livelihoods are significant, current political incentives are aligned with maintaining the status quo. The fishery will continue to...

    Migration and Conservation in the Bale Mountains Ecosystem

    Human migration is playing a significant role in driving land conversion and sustaining the overexploitation of key natural resources in the Bale Mountains ecosystem, to the detriment of conservation and traditional livelihoods. A similar process of land conversion is taking place in the absence of an influx of migrants, albeit at a much slower pace, and the ecosystem is under threat from a variety of factors, including population growth, changing climate conditions, and shifting livelihood strategies and socioeconomic expectations of the resident population. But in a context of rapid socioeconomic change and escalating internal population pressures, migration accelerates and intensifies the livelihood changes and associated land conversion processes that are inevitable in the long term. This will continue, unless effective and sustainable resource management systems are put in place.

    This report presents an assessment of the migration context in the Bale Mountains ecosystem, as...

    Migration and Conservation in the Bale Mountains Ecosystem (Policy Brief)

    Human migration is playing a significant role in driving land conversion and sustaining the overexploitation of key natural resources in the Bale Mountains ecosystem, to the detriment of conservation and traditional livelihoods. A similar process of land conversion is taking place in the absence of an influx of migrants, albeit at a much slower pace, and the ecosystem is under threat from a variety of factors, including population growth, changing climate conditions, and shifting livelihood strategies and socioeconomic expectations of the resident population. But in a context of rapid socioeconomic change and escalating internal population pressures, migration accelerates and intensifies the livelihood changes and associated land conversion processes that are inevitable in the long term. This will continue, unless effective and sustainable resource management systems are put in place.

    This policy brief summarizes an assessment of the migration context in the Bale Mountains...

  • Auctions Emerge as Key Instrument to Promote Renewable Energy

    El Salvador’s National Energy Council recently announced plans to auction 150 MW of renewable energy projects. Brazil awarded contracts to the developers of 669.5 MW of clean energy capacity last week in its latest auction. And the ACT government in Australia has launched its second large-scale wind farm auction, which is expected to double the … Continue reading Auctions Emerge as Key Instrument to Promote Renewable Energy

    Saving Power for Rainy Days

    As rapid cost reductions for renewable energy technologies drive an energy transition across the globe, one fundamental question remains regarding a future powered by renewables: “What about when the sun doesn’t shine and the wind doesn’t blow?” Electricity storage is often positioned as THE solution to the problem of variable (i.e. not consistent) power generation from solar … Continue reading Saving Power for Rainy Days

    Energy Efficiency Vital to Doubling Global Share of Renewables

    It may sound obvious that efforts to scale-up renewable energy and efforts to improve energy efficiency are interlinked. We consume less energy overall when we implement energy efficiency measures like installing building insulation or efficient lighting. In parallel, as we add more renewable energy to the world’s energy mix, the share of renewable vs. non-renewable … Continue reading Energy Efficiency Vital to Doubling Global Share of Renewables

    Pacific Island Countries and Territories Explore Ways to Transform Energy Systems

    “What is the utility business model after all? It’s making returns on assets. And moving from fossil fuels to renewables will increase the asset base and the actual value of the utility, increasing its revenues.”- Dutch Kuyper, Parker Ranch In explaining the sound business case for transitioning traditional utilities to renewable energy, Dutch Kuyper of … Continue reading Pacific Island Countries and Territories Explore Ways to Transform Energy Systems

    REthink Energy on the Road to Paris

    In the lead up to the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 21), 30 November – 11 December in Paris, we are encouraging our readers to REthink energy. The energy sector accounts for more than two thirds of global greenhouse-gas emissions. Under current policies and national plans, carbon dioxide emissions will not fall enough to avoid … Continue reading REthink Energy on the Road to Paris

  • Regional Development Forum for Asia-Pacific held in Bangkok

    The ITU Regional Development Forum (RDF) for Asia and the Pacific was held in Bangkok, Thailand on 21 and 22 August 2015 under the theme “Smartly Digital Asia-Pacific”. The Forum was attended by about 100 participants from over 31 Member...

    ITU Distributes Trend Micro 2Q 2015 Security Roundup

    In line with the collaboration between ITU and Trend Micro, with an objective to facilitate sharing of relevant cybersecurity material and enhance cybersecurity awareness of Member States, ITU is distributing the Trend Micro 2Q roundup report for 2015. Titled ‘A...

    Communiqué: ITU deploys emergency communication equipment in Myanmar

    International relief effort underway in aftermath of widespread floods Geneva, 18 August 2015 – ITU has deployed emergency telecommunication equipment in Myanmar following severe floods which have claimed many lives and submerged more than 200,000 acres of farmland, damaging essential infrastructure and...

    Meet the winners of the #speakstandards video competition

    A team of four from Mexico has won first prize in the #speakstandards video competition. Their video highlighting the importance of standardized graphical symbols in our daily life received half of the nearly 6,500 public votes. The #speakstandards video competition challenged people...

    Press Release : ITU announces Telecom World Entrepreneurship Awards

    Award to recognize small businesses and entrepreneurs using innovative ICT solutions for social good Geneva, 11 August 2015 – ITU has launched the ITU Telecom World Entrepreneurship Awards 2015, a new awards programme for the most innovative start-ups, micro-, small and medium-sized businesses...

  • Groups File Notice of Intent to Sue EPA Over Dangerous Drilling and Fracking Waste

    WASHINGTON, D.C.  (August 26, 2015) – A coalition of environmental organizations filed a legal notice with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today demanding regulations to stop oil and gas companies from dumping drilling and fracking waste in ways that threaten public health and the environment.

    NRDC Turns Up Pressure on Subway to Disclose Antibiotic Use in Meat Production

    WASHINGTON D.C. (August 26, 2015) – As Subway marks its 50th anniversary later this week, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) today launched a national campaign urging Subway, the world’s largest fast food chain by number of locations, to publicly commit to phasing out the purchase of meats raised with the routine use of antibiotics. Many of Subway’s competitors, including McDonalds, Chick-Fil-A, Chipotle and Panera Bread, and others, have announced major initiatives to eliminate routine use of antibiotics by their suppliers, leaving Subway far behind the pack.  

    Report: Significant Energy Efficiency Savings Available to Ohioans for Years to Come

    CHICAGO (August 26, 2015) – A new study finds there is huge potential in Ohio to save families and businesses money on their utility bills through energy saving programs. This study by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), which examines reports from Ohio utilities as well as industry-standard programs that Ohio has yet to take into account, concludes the state has significant, cost-effective, and untapped energy efficiency potential just waiting to be utilized.

    New Jersey Court Approves Bad Deal Between Christie Administration & ExxonMobil Over Decades of Oil Refinery Pollution

    MOUNT HOLLY, N.J. (August 25, 2015) – A New Jersey court today approved a settlement between ExxonMobil and Governor Chris Christie’s administration over damages due for decades of toxic soil and water contamination in the northern part of the state. The settlement gives the oil giant a more than 98 percent discount on the state’s original price tag for restoring and replacing the resources.

    NRDC: White House Initiative on Energy Efficiency and Other Clean Energy a Huge Step Forward

    WASHINGTON (August 24, 2015) – The public-private initiative announced today by the Obama Administration will ease some of the worst impacts of climate change being felt in America’s low-income communities, where parents struggle to pay high energy bills and their children suffer from intensified cases of asthma and other respiratory diseases.

  • Corporate WASH pledge helps 1.6 million people gain access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene

    [No supplied article summary]

    Sustainable Procurement Guide

    Informed procurement choices can support the sustainable management of forests, help protect workers’ health and the rights of the people who depend on forests. Growing numbers of private and public sector actors are setting ambitious targets to eliminate deforestation from their supply chains. The question remains: How to implement and deliver on these commitments?

    From waste to opportunity: Over 20 companies launch new project to scale up material reuse across US facilities

    [No supplied article summary]

    Raising the bar for the forest products value chain

    [No supplied article summary]

    Land degradation neutrality: Why this should be on top of the business agenda

    [No supplied article summary]